Day 817: Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Frederick Douglas NHS, Anacostia Park, Oxon Cove Park, Fort Washington Park

Today we focused on the east side of DC metro.  Our first stop was Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens:

Day_817_01

Kenilworth Gardens is a former water plant nursery donated to the NPS, effective after the death of the owners, to avoid imposed filling of the ponds here as “marsh reclamation” by the Army Corps of Engineers:

Day_817_03

Day_817_04

We walked the grounds:

Day_817_06

Day_817_07

Day_817_08

Day_817_09

M tried on his paper Junior Ranger hat:

Day_817_10

Day_817_11

Day_817_12

It’s very late in the season, so most of the lilies are gone now, but the massive lily pads of the Amazon water-lily haven’t completely died off:

Day_817_13

Day_817_14

The kids completed their Junior Ranger workbooks and received their badges:

Day_817_02

Day_817_05

The ranger gave to the kids both the newer plastic and older wooden badges:

Day_817_15

Day_817_16

We stopped briefly at Fort Dupont Park, but the ranger station was closed.  We continued on to Frederick Douglass National Historic Site:

Day_817_17

The site preserves the house in present-day Anacostia where Frederick Douglass lived from 1877 until his death in 1895:

Day_817_18

Day_817_19

All of the interior furnishings are originals:

Day_817_20

Day_817_21

Day_817_22

Day_817_23

Day_817_24

Day_817_25

Day_817_26

Day_817_27

Day_817_28

Day_817_29

Day_817_30

We toured the small visitor center:

Day_817_31

The kids completed their Junior Ranger workbooks and received their badges:

Day_817_32

Day_817_33

Our next stop was Anacostia Park, where we visited the headquarters of National Capital Parks-East.  The kids completed the National Capital Parks-East workbook, and received a badge for both National Capital Parks-East and Anacostia Park:

Day_817_34

Day_817_35

The kids also completed the National Capital Parks-East “Climate Friendly” Junior Ranger workbook:

Day_817_36

Continuing south, we visited Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm, an NPS site last used as farmland to grow crops and act as farm therapy for the patients at a nearby mental hospital:

Day_817_37

Day_817_38

Day_817_39

Day_817_40

Day_817_49

Day_817_41

Day_817_42

Day_817_43

This house, built in 1807, is called Mount Welby:

Day_817_44

Day_817_45

Day_817_46

Day_817_47

The kids completed their Junior Ranger workbooks and received their Junior Ranger badges:

Day_817_48

Day_817_50

Day_817_51

The ranger also gave each of them the old patch they used to use:

Day_817_52

The kids already completed the Junior Ranger program for the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom on Day 665, but here they had the older badges so we received those as well:

Day_817_53

Our last stop of the day was Fort Washington Park, built in 1809, and expanded in 1824, the 1840s, and the 1890s.

One of many fortifications here, an Endicott period battery, built in the 1890s, equipped with disappearing guns:

Day_817_54

The 1824 fort, built of brick.  As we learned during our 2012 visit to Fort Pulaski, before the invention of the rifled cannon, masonry forts were sufficiently strong to resist smoothbore cannon fire:

Day_817_55

Day_817_56

Day_817_57

Day_817_58

Day_817_59

Day_817_60

The tracks for the cannon mounts remain:

Day_817_61

Day_817_62

Day_817_63

Day_817_64

Day_817_66

Day_817_67

Day_817_68

Day_817_69

Day_817_70

Day_817_72

We walked down to the waterfront battery:

Day_817_73

Day_817_74

The old fort from the river:

Day_817_75

Day_817_76

Day_817_77

The kids completed their workbooks and received their Junior Ranger badges:

Day_817_71

Day_817_78

Tomorrow we hope to our the Capitol building.

Day 816: Visiting Washington DC
Day 818: Visiting the Capitol

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>